How Web Experts Can Avoid Overspending

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It is a scenario that plays out in offices every year revolving around web developers and designers. They present an idea to bosses, and the idea involves investing in expensive equipment with nary a clue on how to use it.

over spending How Web Experts Can Avoid Overspending

Image via Shuuterstock

Investing in expensive technology may make you look impressive to the boss, but what happens when you spend too much money on a product and it doesn’t get the desired results? Sometimes more isn’t necessarily good. The old phrase, less is better, works here.

A common trap many companies fall into is the overpriced gambit. Of course salespeople will want to sell you the newest, most costly technology. They have to make money too, right? And while the salespeople dream of high commissions on their products, you are stuck realizing the product you bought may not do what previous products have done.

Windows 8, although it is new and not known by very many people yet, is an example of a product that strikes fear into the minds of designers and developers. Windows 8 uses touch-screen technology instead of the drop-down menus and control panels that previous versions of Windows use. If you, as a designer or developer, are interested in current technology, using something new might be scary.

New products might require additional software to use, sometimes planned and sometimes not planned. New products sometimes might not work, resulting in a lot of work by the IT department to get them in proper condition.

Instead of buying new, a common thing to do is look for used items such as gently-used computer equipment, software or hardware tools. When these items depreciate from new status, often they are sold for a fraction of the price. It is the same idea behind buying used cars instead of new. If the product gets even a small amount of use, then it has to be sold for a cheaper price upon resale. Remember, if the computer or tech equipment you’re buying is for your business, then it may even qualify for a tax deduction. You may need to find a few free tax calculators to figure that out though. There are many companies that specialize in lower-cost yet higher-quality computers and electronic equipment, like Techforless.com   and going the gently-used route will show you are cost-thrifty. That will please a boss trying to save a few dollars.

You will not get this lucky when it comes to hardware, but if you are looking for lower-cost software with few frills, then consider a free version of a product. Expensive anti-virus programs won’t do you any good if they let a bug go through that causes hundreds of dollars in repairs. Go with free versions of software programs. This way, you can decide whether you like the product enough to go with the paid version.
The lesson to this story is green doesn’t always equal success. Sometimes the less money you spend on a product, the better off you are. This will leave more money to sink into the business in the future on items where you need the expense more.

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There is 1 comment for this article
  1. Matt Parrott at 2:49 pm

    Overspending? Wait, what?

    What other artisans have a vast seething global army of support staff striving to ensure that their tools are awesome and free?

    Aside from a handful of trivial costs that are already sunk (laptop, internet connection, and smart phone), and arguably Photoshop (I get along fine with Gimp), there is no cost that I’m aware of.

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